≡ Menu

Prolonging life by saving lives

This post is a continuation of the previous 2 articles obtained from a book compiled from Dr Lai Chiu Nan’s advise.

Part 4

Life-saving

The universal law is that you reap what you sow. Whether it’s the Christian or Buddhist teaching, we reap what we sow.

That is what nature teaches us. Whatever seeds we plant, we get the same plant and the same fruit. There is never a mix-up.

So if we want to lengthen our lives, we need to plant the seeds of protecting lives.

If it is a critical case, you need to very actively save lives. We can ask our friends not to kill on our behalf. By not eating a plate of shrimps, you save 10 or more lives.

We can ask our friends to pledge to us, “This month, I pledge 10 days on which I will not kill.” Not even mosquitoes!

That’s indirectly saving lives. It doesn’t cost you a cent.

Change your life

If it’s a critical case, you have to change your whole life. It’s not enough to just change your dietary habits. You have to be very aggressive and try in your own way to benefit  others.

When we help others, we are happy. It raises our energy.

Even a positive thought. If you are very weak, there’s not much you can do physically. But you can still support certain charities with your money. You can support certain good works, certain publications and good books, or copies of good tapes.

Visualise loving thoughts- like the one I taught you…put the Earth in your hearts and think of blue light.

You can do that. Just think ‘love” to the whole Earth, to all the living things on the Earth and wishing each being a Good Life.

Just a loving attitude will help. It will help raise our energy.

In Canada, there was a woman who was diagnosed with melanoma (skin cancer) that had spread to the bones. The doctor gave her three months to live, as there was nothing that could be done. Melanoma is fairly deadly, especially after it has spread to the bones.

She was a fashion consultant with her own television programme, a very successful woman.  A very, very busy woman.

And she thought, “If I am going to die, I might as well go somewhere pretty. “So she went to Nepal.

There, she encountered a monk who taught her to save lives. She went back to Vancouver and, as the ships came into port, she would buy the fish and shrimps and let them go.

And if dogs and cats were going to be killed, she would buy them and save them.

She did this very enthusiastically for a period of three months. And her cancer was completely gone.

I called her four years later because I heard about her story and I was very interested.

“How many lives did you save every day?” I asked her.

She said, “One hundred.”

In a critical case, you have to be very active. Usually, it is recommended that you save at least the same number as your age. So if you are 50 years old, you save 50 lives. She was saving 100 lives per day.

And she said, “It’s funny that you should be calling be now, because after I got well, I started deviating.”

During the period when she was recovering, she got in touch with what she felt the world should be. She was a fashion consultant. She decided it was more important to be a consultant for business ethics.

Not once, but twice

And she took more time for herself, to meditate.

But after she got well, she got back to her old ways and started to eat meat. And just two months before I called her, she found a lump in her left breast.

So she went back to saving lives. And again, her cancer went away- not just once, but twice.

The universal law is, you reap what you sow. It’s so simple!

If you plant a bitter melon seed, you will get a bitter melon. You will never get a sweet melon.

Yet it never occurred to us that when we work for others, it comes back to ourselves.

So every action, every thought that we have… if it is motivated by love, it brings us the fruits of happiness. If we cause harm to others, it will come back to harm ourselves.

This is not a “big” law. It is nature’s law.

My 2 cents:

Life saving is therapeutic. I’ve started to do it through reading the advise by Dr Lai as per above. I remember I would go the market with a pail to buy live fresh water fishes- I would carry these fishes to the car and let my mom release the fishes.  I did that the time when my mom was undergoing treatment and during her recovery. As she was releasing the fishes to the lake, she would give them a message, “now I release you little ones, do take good care of yourself, may you be safe”.

The fishes which at first were struggling, would be in like a momentarily shock- because they thought they would die and suddenly they get freedom. Sometimes I also buy tortoise from the market (rescue them from being slaughtered), my favourite animals and let my mom release them in the river.

If anything, saving lives is therapeutic. I remember we were so down and don’t have the answers- but releasing the fishes gave some comfort- because even though we don’t know how things turned out to be, but giving life to other living beings uplift our spirits. Even though the person may still succumb to the illness, but the memory of releasing animals may offer some peace and happiness.

What happens if the fishes are caught later?

It does not matter. You have done your best to have given the fishes a new lease of life.  Whether they make it or not it’s their life already. You have done your best with the best intentions.

Are we any different from them?

Sometimes, I can’t help but feel that we are no different from the fishes or the chickens that are about to be slaughtered in the market. Everyday when we read the papers, we read about people dying in accidents, natural disasters- those are the fast ones. The slower ones come in the form of disease.

We can be well and healthy today. But we do not know about tomorrow. The thing about life is that, we’ll never know when our turn would be. So it matters to live life right. And a meaningful and most remembered life is one that is kind and serve others.

If you like this post, say thanks by sharing it:

Comments on this entry are closed.